Christian Foundations Thrive in Canada – The Standards For Finding the Most Giving Ones

 

Dr.-Jeffrey-J.-Rodman_356935By Dr. Jeffrey J. Rodman

Canada is a Christian nation. In the 2001 census, fully 77.1% of its citizens identified themselves as Christians. Most of them are Catholics – 46.5 percent of the population. Canada also has well over 1,000 Christian foundations that partner with ministries and churches to promote Christian goals and purposes in Canada.

After finding a foundation that is compatible with your organization and ensuring your organization is worthy of funding, your task is to find the foundation most likely to give to your ministry. There is a multitude of variables to take into account as you are evaluating how likely a foundation is to give to a Christian ministry. You’ll want to consider…

o The extent of the assets held by a foundation

o The number of grants it awards to Christian organizations compared to the number it awards to all organizations

o The value of the grants it awards to Christian organizations

o The percentage of the total number of grants it gives to Christian organizations

o The percentage of the total grant dollars it gives to Christian organizations

o The size of the individual grants it awards (the largest, smallest, and average size grants) to Christian organizations

The following are 12 Canadian Foundations that are more likely to give to Christian ministries and churches ranked solely by the size of their assets.

United Way of Toronto

In its most recent reporting year, the assets of the United Way of Toronto amounted to $119,393,870. Its grants amounted to $121,225,431 and 858 of its 4,864 grants went to religious organizations. A fair amount went to Christian organizations. The value of these grants was $16,642,469. The largest grant was $1,845,691; the smallest was $250; the average was $19,397. The proportion of grants awarded to religious groups was $17.64%; the value was 6.02%.

The United Way collaborates with business, labour, and government leaders in Toronto to address critical community issues.

Your organization must become a member agency to receive funding. The United Way generally admits two new organizations a year.

The Leder Charitable Fund

In its most recent reporting year, The Leder Charitable Fund of Spruce Grove, Alberta had assets totalling $26,535,552, and it awarded 819,000 in grants. Fifty-five of its 109 grants went to religion, mostly to Christian organizations. The value was $2,550. The largest grant was $217,000; the smallest was $1,000; the average was $46,273. The proportion of grants awarded to religious organizations was 50.46%; the value was $73.40%.

The Fund’s interests include the mentally disabled, seminaries, universities. Its funding distribution is as follows: seminaries and other religious colleges, 52%; missionary organizations and evangelism, 23%; social outreach, religious fellowship, auxiliary organizations, 14%.

Christian Stewardship Services

In 2007, its most recent reporting year, the Markham, Ontario-based Christian Stewardship Services had assets amounting to $20,975,531. It awarded grants of $755,161. In 2007 127 of its 288 grants went to Christian organizations. The value was $2,097,079. The largest grant was $156,375; the smallest was $255; the average was $16,512. The proportion of grants going to Christian organizations was 44.10%; the value was 41.91%.

Only 2% of its grants directly funded Christian causes (mostly seminaries and other religious colleges), while 95% supported the charitable sector.

Munday-Maxwell & Gaylene Association

In its most recent reporting year, the Munday-Maxwell & Gaylene Association of Burnaby, British Columbia had assets amounting to $19,311,905 and it provided grants of $3,413,980. Of its 226 grants, 111 went to religious groups, mostly to Christian organizations. The value was $3,563,559. The largest grant was $158,000; the smallest was $1,000; the average was $32,104. The proportion of grants going to religious organizations was 49.12%; the value was 33.75%.

The Foundation’s geographic scope is Canada wide. It funding distribution was as follows: seminaries and other religious colleges, 14%; religious publishing and broadcasting, 13%; missionary organizations and evangelism, 12%.

Fleming Foundation (Beamsville, Ontario)

In its most recent reporting year, the assets of the Fleming Foundation of Beamsville, Ontario amounted to $9,270, 207. It awarded $407,195 in grants. Thirty-six of the 253 grants it awarded went to religious, mostly Christian, organizations. The value was $826,009. The largest grant was $212,500; the smallest was $600; the average was $22,945. The proportion of grants awarded to religious, mostly Christian, organizations was 14.23%; the value was 36.48%.

Fundable organizations include Christian organizations that support international aid abroad and social services in Canada such as food or clothing banks, soup kitchens, hostels.

TELUS Charitable Trust

In its most recent reporting year, the TELUS Charitable Trust of Edmonton, Alberta reported assets totalling $5,341,199. Its grants also totalled $5,341,199. Of its 2,027 grants, 531 went to religious, mostly Christian, organizations. The value was $2,435,999. The largest grant was $104,224; the smallest was $250; the average was $4,588. The proportion of grants awarded to religious organizations was 26.20%; the value was 20.00%.

The Foundation’s purpose is to gather donations from corporations inside the TELUS group and forward them to charities. TELUS matches employee contributions on a 1:1 ratio for all registered Canadian, nonreligious charities. The Foundation’s geographic focus is Canada wide.

Christian Economic Assistance Foundation

In its most recent reporting year, the Christian Economic Assistance Foundation of Ancaster, Ontario had assets amounting to $2,520,812. Its grants totaled $8,424,145. Twenty-four of its 65 grants went to Christian organizations. The value was $5,403,438. The largest grant was $518,200; the smallest was $15,300; the average was $225,143. The proportion of grants awarded to Christian organizations was $14.55%; the value was 14.89%.

The Foundation funds societies, organizations, and associations that promote Christian thinking and action. It provides tuition assistance and scholarships and supports schools, Christian schools, and Christian education projects.

Its funding distribution is as follows: 90% to charity; 10% to schools and education.

The De Boer Foundation

In its most recent reporting year, The De Boer Foundation of Concord, Ontario reported assets amounting to $1,062,955 and it awarded grants that totaled $52,930. Religious, largely Christian, organizations received 32 of its 125 grants. The value was $94,731. The largest grant was $10,000; the smallest was $500; the average was $2,960. The proportion of grants going to religious organizations was 25.60%; the value was 28.22%.

The Foundation’s funding interest is Christian organizations, schools, missions, and missionaries. It funds building, operating, and program expenses, and special projects. Its geographic focus is Canada wide, emphasizing Ontario.

Fleming Foundation (Abbotsville, Ontario)

In its most recent reporting year, the Fleming Foundation of Abbotsville, Ontario had assets totalling $805,133 and it awarded grants amounting to $314,975. Thirty-one of its 76 grants went to Christian organizations. The value was $1,538, 848. The largest grant was $379,000; the smallest was $350; the average was $48,640. The proportion of grants awarded to Christian organizations was 40.79%; the value was 73.05%.

The Foundation’s funding interests include Christian organizations and churches. Its geographic focus is Canada wide. Its Christian funding distribution is as follows: missionary organizations and evangelism, 73%; places of worship, congregations, parishes, diocese, fabrics, etc., 14%; religious publishing and broadcasting, 4%.

William Voortman Fund

In its most recent reporting year, the William Voortman Fund of Waterdown, Ontario reported assets amounting to $322,309 and grants of $1,217,000. It provided 86 grants, with 49 going to religious, mostly Christian, organizations. The value was $914,750. The largest grant was $150,000; the smallest was $1,000; the average was $18,688. The proportion of grants awarded to religious groups was 56.98; the value was 36.63%.

Inner Peace Foundation

In its most recent reporting year, the Inner Peace Foundation of Ancaster, Ontario claimed assets totalling $25,207. It awarded $27,000 in grants. Fifty-three of its 129 grants went to Christian organizations. The value was $427,025. The largest grant was $47,500; the smallest was $1,000; the average was $8,057. The proportion of grants awarded to Christian organizations was 41.07%; the value was 44.45%.

The Foundation’s geographic focus is the Niagra-Horshoe area and third world countries. It funds Christian education, organizations, and schools, Mennonite Churches and organizations, missions, missionaries, and religious media. It also provides tuition assistance.

EnCana Cares

In its most recent reporting year, the assets of EnCana Cares of Calgary, Alberta amounted to $19, 813, and it awarded $2,862,756 in grants. Forty of the 1,500 grants went to religion, the vast majority of which to Christian organizations. The value of the grants was $919, 615. The largest grant awarded was $131, 742; the smallest was $250; the average was $22,990. The proportion of grants awarded to religious organizations was 2.66%; the value was 8.49%.

EnCana seeks to bolster the well being and sustainability of the communities in which it operates. Its geographic focus is Canada wide. It funds only religious organizations with programs that are non-sectarian and that prioritize capacity building. Organizations must be financially viable to be eligible for grants.

This list of foundations will provide you with a good place to start as these are foundations supporting Christian ministries in Canada that have the largest assets. However, you will still need to take other issues into consideration that are specific to your organization.

Jeffrey J. Rodman is a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) and a Certified Grants Specialist (CGS). He is an experienced grantwriter, fundraiser, nonprofit executive, and public speaker who operates Here-4-You Christian Grant Consulting and Church Grant Writing providing consultation for grant writing to Christian ministries and Churches worldwide.

Jeffrey supervises a team of writers, researchers, editors, and administrative staff in providing consultation for grant proposal writing, nonprofit development, and fundraising in almost every state and a dozen foreign countries and has worked on proposals to Federal, State, and Local government as well as to Foundations, Civic groups, and many others.

Jeffrey received his BS and his M.Ed. from George Mason University. He has written 100’s proposals, secured millions of dollars in funding, and maintains a funding rate of nearly 80%. He has successfully managed over 25 different grants as a grant administrator and has also served as a grant reviewer on a state, federal, and local level as well as on foundation review panels. Jeffrey is an experienced speaker and is a Certified National Trainer for programs in Ohio, Indiana, Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Florida.

Jeffrey loves to play games with his kids and enjoy time with his family. Although he grew up in New York, he has lived in Virginia since 1996 where he and his wife, Terri homeschool their five children, Alexandra (12), Mackenzie (9), Christian (7) Kaitlyn (3), and Abigail (born 02/10/2010).

Here-4-You Christian Grant Consulting
Jeffrey J. Rodman, CFRE, CGS, M.Ed.
President & CEO
Website: http://www.npfunds.com
Blog: http://npfunds.com/blog
Phone: 1-866-HERE-4-U-1

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